Categories
No really

Let this be a reminder how frustrate​d i was

Let this be a reminder how frustrate​d i was.

To the wrong person, you can see it, right?

Ego. He just likes using his photo.

Yeah, that’s it.

Happy present moment.

Anyone who owns their own business understands that it’s different than working for someone else. Entirely different. There isn’t a thing as a business owner that you don’t have to be concerned with. You’re responsible for it all.

All. Of. It.

Every. Day.

All. Day.

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Categories
Being Brave

How many books should a first time author order?

Lone yellow ball on dimly lit floor
Some curious questions come with no-risk answers like, what is this photo?

 

How many books should a first time author order?

How much of anything should a small business entrepreneur invest in?

If we’ve never struck out on our own, then when we do, everything is new. Uncharted. Unpredictable. Uncertain. Uncomfortable.

A true test of patience, and vision.

Reminds one of Lewis and Clark.

Next Blog

 

Back To The Books

Indomitable Will
Indomitable Will

Rich Dad Poor Dad.

Here is the life-changing take-away:

When you work for someone else, you:

  1. Earn
  2. Pay Taxes
  3. Spend

When you work for yourself, you:

  1. Earn
  2. Spend
  3. Pay Taxes

I ain’t the brightest bulb in the box, but I get this. It took a lifetime, and a great book, but I get it now.

Of course, not knowing this most basic of economic structure is very embarrassing.

My Dad had two side businesses.  My Grandfather had one too. My wife’s Grammy ran a one-room grocery store for 45 years.

What did they teach me?

Nothing.

How is that possible?

There is no good or decent answer, except to say, “That’s just the way it was back then.”

What a shame. But it is what it is.  No bitterness.  Lost opportunity to be sure.  But no bitterness.

Now, only hope, determination and of course, indomitable will.  Like the early pioneers.

Two Days Ago

What Are the Odds?
What Are the Odds?

Two days ago you saw the post about someone I know who got a separation package.

He saw it coming and started a business in advance of the separation.

Remember?

What I didn’t mention then, but must now, his chances for survival after five years are as good as all the others starting a business.

Entrepreneurial people have to work very, very hard.  Why?  Because if they fail…

But if they succeed, they have amazing opportunities.

But no one ever talks openly about the odds.  You know why?

You do know the odds right?

Gain Knowledge in Amazing Places

Knowledge. Wow!  Some say, Knowledge is power.  Ever heard that phrase?

Next question, “Do you believe it’s true”?

I do, mostly.  However, just knowing is not enough for me.

And by the way, you can gain knowledge at parties, the Internet, and simply through experience.

Way more important though, is applying the knowledge.  Ya with me?

On July 4th, at a friends party, I spoke with a retired small business owner.   What got us talking was my question, “Do you run”? He certainly didn’t look 65 to me.  Not even close.

Anyway, I got some great small business tips from him:

  1. Number one, most important – be passionate about what you do
  2. Build long-term relationships;  never burn any bridges
  3. Deliver POS – Positively Outrageous Service

I asked another question, “I’ve heard that you either run your business or it runs you.  What do think of that”?

This led to a final, and critical message –Be prepared to work your life around your business.

In my 35 years paying taxes, I’ve worked in organizations where the leader said, “Run it like it’s your own business”. Heck, I used to try to inspire my direct reports with the exact same message.

It sure looks good on paper doesn’t it?  “Run it like it’s yours”. Until I did the math.

Searching the Internet for validation, I found various studies conclude anywhere from 50% to 80% of start-up businesses disappear within five years, with the majority within two years.

I paused.  Reflected on the significance.  And then acted on this knowledge in a dramatically different way than ever before, 18 months ago.

And to my surprise and delight, it’s made me a significantly better professional speaker.

Carpe diem, jungle jeff 🙂