Categories
Video Sharing

Excellent Ted Talk parody and…

Excellent Ted Talk parody and…

While this video parody is funny, it’s important to know beyond a shadow of a doubt, great speakers are intentional, and, spontaneous.

However, the shorter the speech, the more intentionality required.

The longer the speech, more room for spontaneity.

The irony is Pat Kelly had to do exactly what he was making fun of – being intentional and methodical.

And by the way, his talk was poignant, except for the standing ovation.

 

 

 

__________

 

This website is about our career health. To leave this site to read today’s post on my home health website, click here.

 

On April Fool’s Day 2009, jeff noel began writing five daily, differently-themed blogs (on five different sites). It was to be a 100-day self-imposed “writer’s bootcamp”, in preparation for writing his first book. He hasn’t missed a single day since.

 

Categories
Professionally Speaking

Great speaking advice

 

Good, solid advice.

World champion.

Who knew there was such a thing?

 

__________

 

This website is about our career health. To leave this site to read today’s post on my home health website, click here.

 

On April Fool’s Day 2009, jeff noel began writing five daily, differently-themed blogs (on five different sites). It was to be a 100-day self-imposed “writer’s bootcamp”, in preparation for writing his first book. He hasn’t missed a single day since.

 

Categories
Professionally Speaking

From the chief of staff to the cleaning staff

jeff noel Disney Keynote Speaker
Executives sitting front and center.

 

jeff noel Disney Keynote Speaker
Never neglect the back rows if you can avoid it. Upper left corner, see the speaker?

 

jeff noel Disney Keynote Speaker
Big rooms are harder to fill (and keep filled) with energy.

 

jeff noel Disney Keynote Speaker
Audience participation up on stage is a great way to create energy in a room.

 

jeff noel Disney Keynote Speaker
Animated body language generates energy.

 

From the Board room to the bathrooms and everywhere in between, the speaker’s methods and messages must resonate universally. When a client is paying a premium for a world-class engagement, it’s best to deliver world-class.

 

__________

 

This website is about our career health. To leave this site to read today’s post on my home health website, click here.

 

On April Fool’s Day 2009, jeff noel began writing five daily, differently-themed blogs (on five different sites). It was to be a 100-day self-imposed “writer’s bootcamp”, in preparation for writing his first book. He hasn’t missed a single day since.

 

Categories
If Disney Ran Your Life

Disney creativity experiment on LinkedIn yesterday

The text in this photo sets the context for today’s post…

 

Disney Creativity jeff noel
This was inspired after having taken the risk to do my first Guest PodCast appearance.

 

Disney creativity experiment on LinkedIn yesterday:

Sean called in less than a minute. We spoke for an hour. He asked for advice, so i gave him exactly what i did to launch my business in 2009:

1. Don’t quit your day job

  • Life will be hard whether you work two jobs or are desperately trying to be discovered in only one job
  • Having a steady income takes pressure off and buys you time to develop your dream

2. Write publicly

  • Don’t expect any readers (except family) and don’t try to be perfect
  • This refines what you truly believe in and how you want to say it

3. Live in gratitude

  • Try being unhappy when you’re grateful
  • You, like everyone else, are in a hell, coming out of a hell, or about to enter a hell know one knows about; it can’t be an excuse or crutch

4. Set a compelling deadline

  • Accelerates decisions
  • Eliminates excuses

Sean’s story humbled and inspired me.

Thinking creatively at Disney is like breathing – no thought whatsoever.

 

__________

 

On April Fool’s Day 2009, jeff noel began writing five daily, differently-themed blogs (on five different sites). It was to be a 100-day self-imposed “writer’s bootcamp”, in preparation for writing his first book. He hasn’t missed a single day since.

This website is about our career health. To leave this site to read today’s post on my home health website, click here.

 

Categories
If Disney Ran Your Life

A cut and paste Pixar story basics list from Emma Coats

Disney University lobby
Yesterday at 11:30am, waiting for lunch group.

 

A cut and paste Pixar story basics list from Emma Coats:

•  •  •  •  •

Pixar story artist Emma Coats has tweeted a series of “story basics” over the past month and a half — guidelines that she learned from her more senior colleagues on how to create appealing stories:

#1: You admire a character for trying more than for their successes.

#2: You gotta keep in mind what’s interesting to you as an audience, not what’s fun to do as a writer. They can be v. different.

#3: Trying for theme is important, but you won’t see what the story is actually about til you’re at the end of it. Now rewrite.

#4: Once upon a time there was ___. Every day, ___. One day ___. Because of that, ___. Because of that, ___. Until finally ___.

#5: Simplify. Focus. Combine characters. Hop over detours. You’ll feel like you’re losing valuable stuff but it sets you free.

#6: What is your character good at, comfortable with? Throw the polar opposite at them. Challenge them. How do they deal?

#7: Come up with your ending before you figure out your middle. Seriously. Endings are hard, get yours working up front.

#8: Finish your story, let go even if it’s not perfect. In an ideal world you have both, but move on. Do better next time.

#9: When you’re stuck, make a list of what WOULDN’T happen next. Lots of times the material to get you unstuck will show up.

#10: Pull apart the stories you like. What you like in them is a part of you; you’ve got to recognize it before you can use it.

#11: Putting it on paper lets you start fixing it. If it stays in your head, a perfect idea, you’ll never share it with anyone.

#12: Discount the 1st thing that comes to mind. And the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th – get the obvious out of the way. Surprise yourself.

#13: Give your characters opinions. Passive/malleable might seem likable to you as you write, but it’s poison to the audience.

#14: Why must you tell THIS story? What’s the belief burning within you that your story feeds off of? That’s the heart of it.

#15: If you were your character, in this situation, how would you feel? Honesty lends credibility to unbelievable situations.

#16: What are the stakes? Give us reason to root for the character. What happens if they don’t succeed? Stack the odds against.

#17: No work is ever wasted. If it’s not working, let go and move on – it’ll come back around to be useful later.

#18: You have to know yourself: the difference between doing your best & fussing. Story is testing, not refining.

#19: Coincidences to get characters into trouble are great; coincidences to get them out of it are cheating.

#20: Exercise: take the building blocks of a movie you dislike. How d’you rearrange them into what you DO like?

#21: You gotta identify with your situation/characters, can’t just write ‘cool’. What would make YOU act that way?

#22: What’s the essence of your story? Most economical telling of it? If you know that, you can build out from there.

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